Will Bill de Blasio Exile Three-Year-Olds from Play?

My family held a Passover Seder in London this year.  A feast of liberation in a city governed by Sadiq Khan, the first Muslim to preside over a major Western capital.  Our haggadah, the guiding text, affirmed our solidarity with refugees across the globe.   The meal was leavened by savory Indian delicacies, mashed up and sampled by the 8-month-old infant at the table.

I loved this version of our annual spring rite: short and unorthodox—a much-needed gaze beyond the navels of our own tribe. But my mind wandered.  I was worried about young children, exiled from play.

On . . . Read full article →

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Andrew Gillum’s Campaign to Bring Home Play

It’s not easy keeping up with the latest in education policy. I have to wade through lots of detritus in my inbox.  And we haven’t even begun to talk about social media, to which, like other previously sentient beings, I have become addicted. I may have to check myself into one of China’s digital detox camps soon.

https://youtu.be/aBBfAcBkLdE

But I’m compelled to abide by that maxim, attributed, variously, to Sun Tzu, Machiavelli, and Michael Corleone in “The Godfather”— the one about keeping your friends close, and your enemies closer.

As a result, I field frequent emails from the Foundation for . . . Read full article →

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A Kindergartner Reserves a Space for #OptOut2020

Welcome to the season of testing, our vernal blood sport. Uploading the schedule took forever. It must have been the server of the New York State Education Department, sclerotic as the bureaucracy itself. But there it was, a memo signed by Deputy Commissioner Angelica Infante-Green. An exam for every public school student on the “education” spectrum—if one could dignify it as such—from third through eighth grade.

Action has intensified in recent weeks.  New York State Allies for Public Education, which has long guided parents in the process of refusal, expressed outrage at a toolkit . . . Read full article →

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The Power of Their Voices: Early Childhood Teachers Talk School Reform

A former preschool teacher carried the torch for democracy at the confirmation hearing for Betsy DeVos, Donald Trump’s nominee for Secretary of Education. “The Senate should not be a rubber stamp,” Patty Murray said.  “We owe it to the American people to put families and children first, not billionaires.”

Those were fighting words from the mild-mannered senator from Washington State, and senior Democrat on the Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions committee.  Especially with Microsoft and Amazon among her top campaign contributors from 2011 to 2016.   But as  the results of our recent election attest, women’s ascent to . . . Read full article →

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