Bruce Fuller Weighs in, Again, on Pre-K for All: But Where Are the Real Experts?

tweets

Bruce Fuller has weighed in—yet again—on universal preschool. He’s had a lot to say over the past few years, as Bill de Blasio, New York City’s mayor, has pursued a bold experiment to combat inequality in a “Tale of Two Cities.”

A professor at Berkeley’s graduate school of education, Fuller is well known for Standardized Childhood, his ten-year-old book that tackles the thorny questions of access and quality in early childhood education, while sticking it to proponents of preschool for all. “Institutional liberals in pursuit of political legitimacy and public dollars” he called them—marching down a dangerous path, well trodden

. . . Read full article →

SHARE

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus

A Bronx Tale: Partnering from Cradle to Career

As state economies tank and ECE moves lower on the policy agenda—our President mentioned nada about early childhood in his State of the Union—we need some cheering up. So here’s a quick update on collaboration and synergy, from early to higher education, in the Bronx.

But first, some hard, cold data:

40 percent of children in the Bronx live in poverty, the highest poverty rating of all boroughs. Ranking New York City’s communities by risks to child well-being (economic, health, safety, community life, education), Mott Haven and Hunts Point pose the greatest risk, with Fordham, East . . . Read full article →

SHARE

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus

Whatever Happened to P-16?

Kudos to Lisa Guernsey, for recently highlighting “a key problem” for early educators: the lack of access, among pre-kindergarten teachers—in state-funded pre-K as well as community-based child care—to federal funding for their professional development.

This “key problem” is one of many systemic issues plaguing early care and education (ECE)—underinvestment, fragmented, low-quality services, inadequate compensation, high turnover—all of which you’ll be hearing about more than you could ever wish. And all of which have maintained ECE’s position as an outlier in U.S. education, not to mention internationally.

Here’s a historical tidbit: From 2000 to 2001, Jeanne Shaheen, then . . . Read full article →

SHARE

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google Plus