First-Grade Teacher Demands Moratorium on NY's P-2 ELA Standards

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Education policymakers in New York have continued to reckon with the fallout from implementation of the Common Core standards, which have ignited fierce opposition among parents, teachers, and administrators. In 2015, the state led the nation in test refusal. Twenty percent, or more than 200,000, third- through eighth-graders, sat out the annual standardized assessments—a number that increased this year.

Peter Rawitsch is certified in early childhood and has taught for 40 years. A first-grade teacher, from Delmar, New York, he was selected by the New York State Education Department to review the Prekindergarten through . . . Read full article →

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Elusive Worthy Wages in de Blasio’s Tale of Two Cities

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“Millions of workers have gotten a raise!” the Economic Policy Institute exulted in an email on Sunday. Income growth in 2015 merited the adjective “superb,” with the fastest gains among black and Hispanic workers.

Yet the early childhood workforce was nowhere to be found. The stewards of our human capital have long suffered from economic insecurity, the euphemism we like to employ for those living in poverty, or nearly on the edge. Out of more than 800 occupations annually surveyed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, only a few report lower median hourly wages . . . Read full article →

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Will Whole-Child Champion Michael Hynes Go All the Way?

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On a Monday evening, as summer ended, the Patchogue-Medford school board on Long Island affirmed its support for superintendent Michael Hynes, extending his contract for five years. President Anthony O’Reilly, as Greater Patchogue reported, was “thrilled beyond belief.”

In the United States, local communities are the hubs of education policymaking. The sentiments of this school board president reflect a philosophical shift away from the cold, rational demands of standards-based accountability, a consensus that children are the top priority. Hynes believes in teaching to the whole child, O’Brien said. He understands that kids are individuals: . . . Read full article →

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