Nancy Bailey’s Delicious Recipe for Reading

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Parents have always taken pride in their offspring’s precociousness, a tendency against which Jean-Jacques Rousseau railed in Emile, the bible of the “New Education,” published in mid-18th-century France. The Enlightenment philosopher introduced formal reading at the advanced age of 12. Mon Dieu!

We’ve come a long way, baby—helped by the likes of Grover J. “Russ” Whitehurst, a proponent of dialogic reading, as well as education policies that have run roughshod over children, squashing their innate curiosity and zest for learning.

Nancy Bailey, author of the book Misguided Education Reform, is a veteran teacher who left the . . . Read full article →

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Doing the Right Thing with The New Early Childhood Professional

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Early childhood professionals have long been a beleaguered species. For starters, they’ve had to battle the perception that they’re “just babysitting,” providing “day care.” Never mind the field’s heroic history, chronicled in Exchange magazine a few years ago by Roger Neugebauer and Debra Hartzell.

Heading the list was the Sheltering Arms Early Education and Family Centers, based in Atlanta and founded in 1888 by a group of women from the First United Methodist Church. They’d begun caring for children in an abandoned boxcar, after finding a little one tied to a bedpost for “safe . . . Read full article →

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